banner
banner

19 May 2022, 18:35 [ UTC - 5; DST ]


Greenwich AeroGroup (banner)



Reply to topic  [ 100 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Username Protected Message
 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 23 Dec 2021, 16:12 
Online


 Profile




Joined: 03/25/12
Posts: 5594
Post Likes: +3011
Location: KCMA - Camarillo, CA
Aircraft: Bonanza G-35
Username Protected wrote:
I flew 177 combat missions over Laos and Cambodia in the Bronco, and loved it from the first time I saw it. It was a very stable weapons platform and a great aerobatic machine. Looking at that video of the washboard runway brought back a memory from training: We were told that the airplane suffered no damage from those tests, but that one of the pilots wound up with a tear of his diaphragm that required surgery. For most of my tour out of Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai AFB I flew over the Ho Chi Minh trail in the daytime with nobody in the back seat (occasionally we had an intel officer back there for familiarization with the Trail and to qualify for combat pay since they were stationed in Thailand, or also occasionally, an Air Force or Navy fighter/attack pilot that wanted to get a closer/lower/slower view of the Trail), and the configuration was the four 30 cal machine guns with 2000 rounds, 4 rocket pods with 28 white phosphorus rockets, and a centerline 600 gal external fuel tank which gave us over 5 hours endurance. For about 6 weeks I flew out of Ubon RTAFB doing the combat evaluation of the Pave Nail Version of the Bronco. (Eval targets were in Cambodia) This one had the stick removed from the back seat to allow for a scope that was attached to a belly pod that replaced the 600 gal external tank. The pod could be rotated 360 deg horizontally and 180 deg vertically. It contained a starlight scope and boresighted laser. In addition a loran receiver and computer were added. Also there were 2 250gal aux tanks, one on a hardpoint of each wing. A navigator rode in the back and operated that gear. When we had a target, the back seater would lase it and the computer would calculate the target's position based on the aircraft position, the laser range, the plane's attitude, and the attitude of the pod. We would then call Hillsboro (daytime C130 ABCCC) or at night Moon Beam and they would launch an alert pad F4 from Ubon armed with a couple of paveway laser guided bombs. When the F4 checked in we would give him the loran time coordinates for the target to put into his computer and told him what attack heading to use. He would come in at 14000 feet, call us 1 minute from bomb release so we had time to get out of the way of the bomb path. When he called bomb away the back seater would start counting down from 32 seconds (bomb fall time), and when he got down to 15 seconds he would start lasing the target. Of the 41 bombs Tom Wilson, my back seater, and I guided during the eval, 40 were bullseyes (the one that missed was about 100 meters long and we assumed that it must have had a stuck guidance fin in the back). After the eval we took all 5 or 6 Pave Nail birds up to NKP and started flying them at night over the Trail. It was a great system, the bomb release happened about 5 miles from the target so they never heard the F4. My experience was that the F4s had to drop an average of 20 to 30 dumb bombs to destroy a single truck in a heavily defended area (the Air Force F100s and the Navy A4s and A7s did much better than that). The paveways more that paid for their cost difference in just the munitions cost not to mention the additional sorties. Plus the F4s were not subjected to the triple A fire.
Blast from the past. I was based at Takhli RTAF 68-69 doing F-105/EB-66 maint. Went TDY many times to Udorn & Ubon to fix broken F-105’s coming back from missions. Not many folks have been through NKP but riding the C-130 transports from base to base took me through there a number of times. PSP runway and looked like a scene from a WWII movie with all the recips.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 23 Dec 2021, 17:52 
Online


 Profile




Joined: 01/21/14
Posts: 4124
Post Likes: +2701
Company: FAA Flight Check
Location: Oklahoma City, OK (KOKC)
Aircraft: King Air 300F/C90GTx
Username Protected wrote:
A pilot buddy I work with flew them in the USAF in the 80s I think. He has some fun stories and facts.

The one that sticks with me however is that he said they could load up 4 or 5 combat loaded Marines in the back, straddling some bench seat thing... and fly them somewhere. Crazy!

They didn't always land with airplane though IIRC :bugeye:


Last edited on 23 Dec 2021, 19:31, edited 1 time in total.

Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 23 Dec 2021, 18:53 
Online



User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 06/23/09
Posts: 6694
Post Likes: +2521
Company: Dermatology
Location: ChattanoogaDayton, TN (2A0)
Aircraft: 1969 Bonanza V35A
Username Protected wrote:
I flew 177 combat missions over Laos and Cambodia in the Bronco, and loved it from the first time I saw it. It was a very stable weapons platform and a great aerobatic machine. Looking at that video of the washboard runway brought back a memory from training: We were told that the airplane suffered no damage from those tests, but that one of the pilots wound up with a tear of his diaphragm that required surgery. For most of my tour out of Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai AFB I flew over the Ho Chi Minh trail in the daytime with nobody in the back seat (occasionally we had an intel officer back there for familiarization with the Trail and to qualify for combat pay since they were stationed in Thailand, or also occasionally, an Air Force or Navy fighter/attack pilot that wanted to get a closer/lower/slower view of the Trail), and the configuration was the four 30 cal machine guns with 2000 rounds, 4 rocket pods with 28 white phosphorus rockets, and a centerline 600 gal external fuel tank which gave us over 5 hours endurance. For about 6 weeks I flew out of Ubon RTAFB doing the combat evaluation of the Pave Nail Version of the Bronco. (Eval targets were in Cambodia) This one had the stick removed from the back seat to allow for a scope that was attached to a belly pod that replaced the 600 gal external tank. The pod could be rotated 360 deg horizontally and 180 deg vertically. It contained a starlight scope and boresighted laser. In addition a loran receiver and computer were added. Also there were 2 250gal aux tanks, one on a hardpoint of each wing. A navigator rode in the back and operated that gear. When we had a target, the back seater would lase it and the computer would calculate the target's position based on the aircraft position, the laser range, the plane's attitude, and the attitude of the pod. We would then call Hillsboro (daytime C130 ABCCC) or at night Moon Beam and they would launch an alert pad F4 from Ubon armed with a couple of paveway laser guided bombs. When the F4 checked in we would give him the loran time coordinates for the target to put into his computer and told him what attack heading to use. He would come in at 14000 feet, call us 1 minute from bomb release so we had time to get out of the way of the bomb path. When he called bomb away the back seater would start counting down from 32 seconds (bomb fall time), and when he got down to 15 seconds he would start lasing the target. Of the 41 bombs Tom Wilson, my back seater, and I guided during the eval, 40 were bullseyes (the one that missed was about 100 meters long and we assumed that it must have had a stuck guidance fin in the back). After the eval we took all 5 or 6 Pave Nail birds up to NKP and started flying them at night over the Trail. It was a great system, the bomb release happened about 5 miles from the target so they never heard the F4. My experience was that the F4s had to drop an average of 20 to 30 dumb bombs to destroy a single truck in a heavily defended area (the Air Force F100s and the Navy A4s and A7s did much better than that). The paveways more that paid for their cost difference in just the munitions cost not to mention the additional sorties. Plus the F4s were not subjected to the triple A fire.


Vince,

Please write a book about your tour as Broncho pilot. It would be well received I think. Jay.

_________________
Jay P.
Having COVID over Christmas SUCKS!!!!!


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 24 Dec 2021, 00:55 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 12/22/07
Posts: 10391
Post Likes: +9930
Company: Midwest Chemtrails LLC
Location: KPTK (SE Michigan)
Aircraft: C205
Vince,

If you do not want to commit to a book, puhleeze keep posting Bronco stories!

_________________
!neercs eht dniheb deppart ma I !PLEH


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 24 Dec 2021, 10:35 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 01/19/16
Posts: 2189
Post Likes: +2906
Location: 13FA Earle Airpark FL/0A7 Hville NC
Aircraft: E33/152A/OV10/23-180
Username Protected wrote:
I flew 177 combat missions over Laos and Cambodia in the Bronco, and loved it from the first time I saw it. It was a very stable weapons platform and a great aerobatic machine. Looking at that video of the washboard runway brought back a memory from training: We were told that the airplane suffered no damage from those tests, but that one of the pilots wound up with a tear of his diaphragm that required surgery. For most of my tour out of Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai AFB I flew over the Ho Chi Minh trail in the daytime with nobody in the back seat (occasionally we had an intel officer back there for familiarization with the Trail and to qualify for combat pay since they were stationed in Thailand, or also occasionally, an Air Force or Navy fighter/attack pilot that wanted to get a closer/lower/slower view of the Trail), and the configuration was the four 30 cal machine guns with 2000 rounds, 4 rocket pods with 28 white phosphorus rockets, and a centerline 600 gal external fuel tank which gave us over 5 hours endurance. For about 6 weeks I flew out of Ubon RTAFB doing the combat evaluation of the Pave Nail Version of the Bronco. (Eval targets were in Cambodia) This one had the stick removed from the back seat to allow for a scope that was attached to a belly pod that replaced the 600 gal external tank. The pod could be rotated 360 deg horizontally and 180 deg vertically. It contained a starlight scope and boresighted laser. In addition a loran receiver and computer were added. Also there were 2 250gal aux tanks, one on a hardpoint of each wing. A navigator rode in the back and operated that gear. When we had a target, the back seater would lase it and the computer would calculate the target's position based on the aircraft position, the laser range, the plane's attitude, and the attitude of the pod. We would then call Hillsboro (daytime C130 ABCCC) or at night Moon Beam and they would launch an alert pad F4 from Ubon armed with a couple of paveway laser guided bombs. When the F4 checked in we would give him the loran time coordinates for the target to put into his computer and told him what attack heading to use. He would come in at 14000 feet, call us 1 minute from bomb release so we had time to get out of the way of the bomb path. When he called bomb away the back seater would start counting down from 32 seconds (bomb fall time), and when he got down to 15 seconds he would start lasing the target. Of the 41 bombs Tom Wilson, my back seater, and I guided during the eval, 40 were bullseyes (the one that missed was about 100 meters long and we assumed that it must have had a stuck guidance fin in the back). After the eval we took all 5 or 6 Pave Nail birds up to NKP and started flying them at night over the Trail. It was a great system, the bomb release happened about 5 miles from the target so they never heard the F4. My experience was that the F4s had to drop an average of 20 to 30 dumb bombs to destroy a single truck in a heavily defended area (the Air Force F100s and the Navy A4s and A7s did much better than that). The paveways more that paid for their cost difference in just the munitions cost not to mention the additional sorties. Plus the F4s were not subjected to the triple A fire.


Vincente,
Please check your log book for this aircraft. Also would be very interested if you have any pics.
Regards,
Norman

OV-10A, s/n 67-14621
Manufactured by North American Aviation, Columbus OH and gained by the USAF on
12 Jun 1968.
Jul 1968 To 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing (Pacific Air Forces), Bien Hoa AB Vietnam
(via Hurlburt Field FL)
Aug 1968 To 504th Tactical Air Support Group (PACAF), Bien Hoa AB Vietnam
Jul 1971 To 504th Tactical Air Support Group (PACAF), Phan Rang AB Vietnam
Dec 1971 To 504th Tactical Air Support Group (PACAF), Da Nang AB Vietnam
Mar 1972 To 366th Tactical Fighter Wing (PACAF), Da Nang AB
Jun 1972 To 6498th Air Base Wing (PACAF), Da Nang AB
Nov 1972 To 56th Special Operations Wing (PACAF), Nakhon Phanom RTAFB
Thailand (deployment to U Tapao RTAFB Thailand)
Sep 1975 To 56th Special Operations Wing (PACAF), U Tapao RTAFB
Oct 1975 To NAS Cherry Point NC
Sep 1976 To 507th Tactical Air Control Wing (Tactical Air Command), Shaw AFB
SC
Jul 1978 To 601st Tactical Air Control Wing (US Air Forces Europe), Wiesbaden
AB Germany
Jun 1984 To 602nd Tactical Air Control Wing (TAC), George AFB CA
Aug 1986 To 343rd Tactical Fighter Wing (Alaskan Air Command), Eielson AFB
AK (deployment to Davis-Monthan AFB AZ)
Sep 1989 To 602nd Tactical Air Control Wing (TAC), George AFB
Jun 1990 To 602nd Tactical Air Control Wing (TAC), Davis-Monthan AFB

Records don’t show the transfer to the Venezuela Air Force in 1990. It was on the ground there with the engines removed in the 1992 Hugo Chavez coup attempt before I acquired it.


Video of one of at least 3 F-16 Bronco shoot downs during the coup attempt

https://youtu.be/nDASW6X0XoU

I purchased 3 that made it back to the airport with battle damage. One had it’s aileron blown off by his buddy that didn’t want to kill him. Another landed gear up on his centerline drop tank and reportedly ejected 0/0 on the runway when it caught fire. The other was riddled with bullet holes. The fourth one was 14621 and was on the ground with engines removed during the coup.

They were recent trainees and were firing on a row of parked F-5s thinking that they were F-16s. Little did they know the F-16s had already scrambled and were jumping the low time Bronco pilots from a nearby base.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 25 Dec 2021, 12:55 
Offline


 Profile




Joined: 04/21/16
Posts: 203
Post Likes: +75
And then there's the Bronco II ;)

https://www.bronco-usa.com/bronco-ii/p/1


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 25 Dec 2021, 14:37 
Offline


 Profile




Joined: 01/01/11
Posts: 942
Post Likes: +577
Company: Well, it's UA now
Location: Houston, TX
Aircraft: B-787 & C55
Is it really a Bronco II or more like a Bronco 1/2?


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 25 Dec 2021, 15:06 
Offline



 Profile




Joined: 01/24/10
Posts: 5809
Post Likes: +3390
Location: Concord , CA (KCCR)
Aircraft: 1967 Baron B55
Bronco II will be great for the drug smugglers. Long distance, fly across the border, drop their load and return.

If they are intercepted they can defend themselves.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 25 Dec 2021, 16:34 
Offline


 Profile




Joined: 01/12/11
Posts: 288
Post Likes: +75
Aircraft: C-182J
I’ve always thought the Bronco would be great to fly. There used to be USMC Broncos based at Dobbins on the Navy side. I flew with a guy that was shot down in Desert Storm. He was caught and was a POW. The Iraqi’s beat him up pretty badly. I could tell he had some deep scars from this experience. His observer didn’t make it during the shoot down, and I think he felt responsible.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2021, 00:09 
Offline


 Profile




Joined: 06/30/11
Posts: 330
Post Likes: +99
Location: KABE
Aircraft: PA31
Norman i will check my logbooks when I get home, but does not appear that plane ever flew out of. N or Ubon. The Covey facs flew out of Danang. D Pleiku. They would definitely have flown that plane. I didnt take any pictures that I didn’t turn over to intel, but I do have some videos.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2021, 00:27 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 12/16/07
Posts: 13364
Post Likes: +12472
Company: Real Estate development
Location: Addison -North Dallas(ADS), Texas
Aircraft: In between
End of ‘68 Covey worked with us west of Khe Sanh. King Bees actually inserted us. 101st extracted us. Small world. I believe we called Moon Beam one evening to get us out. Short mission with long memories.
Thanks for what you did! Critical link for those of us on the ground.

_________________
Dave Siciliano, ATP


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2021, 02:41 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 01/19/16
Posts: 2189
Post Likes: +2906
Location: 13FA Earle Airpark FL/0A7 Hville NC
Aircraft: E33/152A/OV10/23-180
Excellent video with great footage summarizing the history of the Bronco. When I used to run ads wanting to purchase Bronco parts I was contacted about the wood and fiberglass mock up referenced in this video. I put them in touch with the Bronco association that acquired it and restored it and now has it on display in their museum.


https://youtu.be/PiJHa3oe43s


Please login or Register for a free account via the link in the red bar above to download files.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2021, 13:25 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 01/19/16
Posts: 2189
Post Likes: +2906
Location: 13FA Earle Airpark FL/0A7 Hville NC
Aircraft: E33/152A/OV10/23-180
Username Protected wrote:
Norman i will check my logbooks when I get home, but does not appear that plane ever flew out of. N or Ubon. The Covey facs flew out of Danang. D Pleiku. They would definitely have flown that plane. I didnt take any pictures that I didn’t turn over to intel, but I do have some videos.



Vincente,
Thanks-I am sure it would be appreciated by many if you posted the Bronco related videos to YouTube and linked them here. Sadly much valuable history like that slips through the cracks of time and gets lost forever.

Also looking forward to more stories-I am sure you have many.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2021, 09:43 
Offline


 WWW  Profile




Joined: 09/02/11
Posts: 181
Post Likes: +102
Location: N Alabama
Aircraft: 1968 B55
Username Protected wrote:
I’ve always thought the Bronco would be great to fly. There used to be USMC Broncos based at Dobbins on the Navy side. I flew with a guy that was shot down in Desert Storm. He was caught and was a POW. The Iraqi’s beat him up pretty badly. I could tell he had some deep scars from this experience. His observer didn’t make it during the shoot down, and I think he felt responsible.


I was in HMA-773 / HMLA-773, which shared hangar space with VMO-4, the USMCR OV-10 squadron, at Dobbins. Loved being around those planes.


Top

 Post subject: Re: NORTH AMERICAN OV10 BRONCOS
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2021, 23:45 
Offline


User avatar
 Profile




Joined: 01/19/16
Posts: 2189
Post Likes: +2906
Location: 13FA Earle Airpark FL/0A7 Hville NC
Aircraft: E33/152A/OV10/23-180
A good narrated Bronco walk around video by ex Bronco FAC and chairman of the board of the OV-10 Bronco association.

https://youtu.be/jWi7xYE2JWg


Top

Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic  [ 100 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next



Marsh Brothers Aviation (Banner)

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  

Terms of Service | Forum FAQ | Contact Us

BeechTalk, LLC is the quintessential Beechcraft Owners & Pilots Group providing a forum for the discussion of technical, practical, and entertaining issues relating to all Beech aircraft. These include the Bonanza (both V-tail and straight-tail models), Baron, Debonair, Duke, Twin Bonanza, King Air, Sierra, Skipper, Sport, Sundowner, Musketeer, Travel Air, Starship, Queen Air, BeechJet, and Premier lines of airplanes, turboprops, and turbojets.

BeechTalk, LLC is not affiliated or endorsed by the Beechcraft Corporation, its subsidiaries, or affiliates. Beechcraft™, King Air™, and Travel Air™ are the registered trademarks of the Beechcraft Corporation.

Copyright© BeechTalk, LLC 2007-2022

.EagleFuelCellsTriple.jpg.
.avionwealth-85x50.png.
.KalAir_Black.jpg.
.aviationdesigndouble.jpg.
.blackhawk-85x100-2019-09-25.jpg.
.ABS-85x100.jpg.
.planelogix-85x100-2015-04-15.jpg.
.jandsaviation-85x50.jpg.
.wilco-85x100.png.
.tempest.jpg.
.Latitude.jpg.
.ssv-85x50.jpg.
.chairmanaviation-85x50.jpg.
.nexus-85x50.jpg.
.kadex-85x50.jpg.
.concorde.jpg.
.avfab-85x50-2018-12-04.png.
.Expert_Aircraft_Solution_85x50.jpg.
.komn-85x50.png.
.temple-85x100-2015-02-23.jpg.
.bkool-85x50-2014-08-04.jpg.
.MountainAirframe.jpg.
.ps_engineering.gif.
.echelon-85x50.png.
.greenwich-85x50-2020-08-10.jpg.
.saint-85x50.jpg.
.jetshades-85x150.png.
.blr-85x200.jpg.
.garmin-85x200-2021-11-22.jpg.
.xnaut-85x50.jpg.
.kingairdom.jpg.
.kingairacademy-85x100.png.
.pdi-85x50.jpg.
.Wentworth_85x100.JPG.
.airmart-85x150.png.
.avionicssource-85x50.jpg.
.instar.jpg.
.dbm.jpg.
.blackwell-85x50.png.
.stanmusikame-85x50.jpg.
.sierratrax-85x50.png.
.airpower-85x50.jpg.
.centex-85x50.jpg.
.Genesys_85x50.jpg.
.STLAir_85x50.jpg.
.SCA.jpg.
.Marsh.jpg.
.Davis_Aviation_85x50.jpg.
.camguard.jpg.
.AAI.jpg.
.dshannon.jpg.
.aircraftassociates-85x50.png.
.Rocky-Mountain-Turbine-85x100.jpg.
.daytona.jpg.
.forge-85x50.jpg.
.ei-85x150.jpg.
.traceaviation-85x150.png.
.Foreflight_85x50_color.png.
.gallagher_85x50.jpg.
.cav-85x50.jpg.
.wat-85x50.jpg.
.geebee-85x50.jpg.
.tat-85x100.png.
.CiESVer2.jpg.
.jetacq-85x50.jpg.
.bpt-85x50-2019-07-27.jpg.