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17 Dec 2017, 03:59 [ UTC - 5; DST ]


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2014, 01:39 
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Last edited on 13 Mar 2014, 16:17, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2014, 03:11 
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Joined: 11/08/09
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Company: AeroPacific Consulting LLC
Location: Carson City, NV (KCXP)
Aircraft: 1979 Baron 58P
Username Protected wrote:
For TravelAir drivers.
Most POH for the TravelAirs do not have an emergency descent procedure.
It is different from the Baron emergency descent procedure, DO NOT USE FLAPs for an emergency descent in a TravelAir. You will be exceeding the VFe of 113 kts.

Close throttles
Props forward
Speed 130 kts
Gear down


Thread Drift ? :scratch:


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 16 Mar 2014, 14:07 
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Aircraft: BE58P
Kier,
what type of baron do you fly and from where?

I fly a PBaron, TJ403, out of KPAO since '91 and also go into KTRK frequently.

How about using half flaps on TO from KPAO where it lessens the strut punishing loads caused by the small hills emerging in the land-filled runway? Yes, ya gotta get the flaps back up promptly with the gear but the plane gets airborne sooner, the bumps become tolerable and the likelihood of engine failure in that few seconds is small.

Thoughts?

Freeman (Freeman@fafco.com)


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 02 Jun 2014, 17:55 
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Aircraft: Baron 58P
I had a situation climbing thru rain, when leveling off that the down trim would not respond (in fact it would not move - neither electric pickle nor handle). Since the plane was trimmed for climb the amount of force necessary to move the yoke forward to level flight was quite large. Since I was IMC and temperature below freezing, my thought was that I was carrying ice on the tail, altho I had not ice on the wings. I reduced power, muscled the yoke forward to descend into warmer air where the trim became operational again. Therefore I concluded that my diagnosis of ice on the tail was correct, that is until the same symptoms occurred a second time during another flight. Since I had not climbed thru ice, I concluded that the trim itself was frozen at the long piano hinge on the elevator.

I checked with Beech about this and finally found an "old salt" that remembered this condition and said that it was necessary to carefully lubricate the piano hinges on the P-Baron in particular because the hinges could freeze at attitude, particularly if you take of wet or fly thru rain. It was added to my pre-flight check list to check hinges for lube thereafter -


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 12 Oct 2014, 20:45 
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Location: KSMO
Aircraft: J-3C-65
Nice thread with some excellent advice. The guy who suggested not letting go of the gear handle until you verify they're down has the right idea.

The two most import non airplane-specific issues you should be aware of are mindset and ability.

Approach your Baron as if it's trying to kill you. Do not trust it. Have a plan. Never, ever push the throttles forward for takeoff without knowing exactly what you'll do in the event of a motor quitting. Which they will. Not if, when. No factory reman, oil analysis or CHT monitor will keep you alive if you don't have the skills to quickly recognize the failure and secure the engine, all while maintaining control of the airplane. Go to Simcom for initial or hire a very experienced instructor who can put you under the hood and repeatedly kick you in the butt until it's all second nature.

Commit your flying habits to a flow pattern and use the checklist as a "done" list. This enhances safety by creating two separate chances for you to get it right. (Muscle memory AND physical confirmation with a printed or electronic checklist.) Have your boldface procedures not just committed to rote memory, but practice them, again and again until you can do them without using any additional brainpower during periods of adrenaline release. (Which is EXACTLY how you'll be accomplishing them if your airplane is not so courteous as to provide you the abnormal on a day/VMC flight during cruise over flat terrain thousands of feet below.)

Also, be adept at briefing and debriefing. Not only the obvious issues such as what will you do when a prop runs away just as the gear is coming up, but also how to constructively ascertain your performance afterward and incorporate those lessons learned to make your next flight better. Fighter pilots are able to learn how to not only fly a high-performance airplane, but to do so in a variety of adverse conditions, employing many complicated weapons systems and maintaining an awareness of not only what they are doing, but what is happening with the other airplanes around them. They are able to do this with as little as 500 hours of flying time because on every single flight they've ever flown, there has been a brutal, honest debriefing of exactly what mistakes were made. Every single one. They are expected to show up at the jet the next time and not make those same mistakes. It's a little bit more difficult with us - we fly alone. But if you practice honest self-introspection after every flight and work on improving, two things will happen:

You'll get better at debriefing yourself and seeing your mistakes.

You won't make as many of them, and will be able to concentrate on polishing the details and getting much closer to perfection than you now are.


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2014, 12:48 
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Aircraft: BE58P
Here's a few more lessons learned along the way flying my BE58P (TJ403) purchased in 1992:
1. Always double check the DG with runway heading before T/O. Very occasionally mine is out 180 degrees. Something about, "trust but verify..."
2. Hold the brakes and make sure both turbochargers kick in. I had one fail but was way below gross and didn't notice until the climb out.
3. I like to see all egt temps nice and even, full fuel flow and MAP on T/O. Indeed, I tend to run up full power before brake release as Palo Alto is very short (and bumpy).
4. Fuel caps are easily adjusted to prevent vapor discharge but I've embarrassed myself to learn this simple fix.
5. Recently upon preflight at Lebanon in NH (I'm based in Palo Alto), I saw the left fuel main drain dripping slowly. Of course it was late Friday afternoon and I needed to go. A kind mechanic showed me that often just fully turning and returning the valve off will dislodge the culprit and reseal. It did; the mechanic got a nice tip and off I went.
6. Come winter I tend to cycle the boots and check hot prop current as brushes can and have worn to the point that one prop segment stays cold which is not cool.
7. Always close the cockpit door yourself to avoid inadvertent but well intentioned abuse.
5. Depressurize briefly at 13,000 to be sure the "high altitude alert light", set at 12,500 does actuate. Mine did not at one point but my military experience in the low pressure chamber came in handy....

Well, I could go on but this may be enough for now!

From: freeman@fafco.com


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2015, 00:15 
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Aircraft: King Air & Baron
Username Protected wrote:
Hi Y'all, I have a friend with a 68 B baron. It has 400 hr engines, done many yrs ago, and has 470's, not sure if they are carbureted or injected. Avionics are boat anchors, but this would be a good bird to invest in. He wants 35K for the plane, which is what he is in it. He flies it regularly. He has 6 aircraft including a P51. It seems like alot of airplane for the money but I heard a rumor of costly wing spar AD issues? Anybody have info on this wing thing?


Dave,

Yes, start a new thread on this plane and you'll probably get more thoughts. The AD is a required inspection, which is not hard. If a crack is found that exceeds the limits, a doubler kit must be installed, and that gets expensive. If if needs a kit (or 4 of them) be SURE to get someone experienced in that and plan on several thousand.

The 1968 B55 is injected (all of them are). $35K may or may not be a good deal. Obviously needs radios. Autopilot, interior, paint, condition, props, fuel cells, etc, etc?? Lots of questions.

Could be a deal, IF you put minimal radios in (and are happy with that), and doesn't need a lot of other stuff, and the engines are strong which they should be.

And, it is NOT an investment, it's an expense.

:dancing:

Indeed, thank you for the clarification. Investments make you money(or so that's the plan) - airplanes bore holes in the sky where you put money...

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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 25 May 2016, 18:15 
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One of the things you have to make sure you do when you lose an engine on a Baron (and others) is to make sure you apply heavy rudder pressure (dead foot, dead engine), and fight the urge to use the ailerons to combat yaw/roll. This is especially critical when close to the ground, or high power settings. Lower the nose, level the wings while applying rudder will let the plane climb. Use of the ailerons will most likely result in loss of control/spin. If you can't seem to get the plane climbing while close to the ground, slowly pull the power on the operative engine, and pick a spot to land, preferably straight ahead. Sim time, or recent engine out practice with an instructor is invaluable, and most likely will save your, and your passenger's lives. Training, training, training. That's the key to survival when things go bad. Everytime I lay off from my Baron, I'll spend the $$, and get an hour, or 2 dual to sharpen up. Things go bad when you least expect it. I review engine out procedures EVERY single time before I take off. If it happens, you are more prepared. There's no time to get out the check list. N252DP


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 25 May 2016, 23:49 
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Joined: 12/10/07
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Location: Minneapolis, MN (KFCM)
Aircraft: 1970 Baron B55
Username Protected wrote:
One of the things you have to make sure you do when you lose an engine on a Baron (and others) is to make sure you apply heavy rudder pressure (dead foot, dead engine), and fight the urge to use the ailerons to combat yaw/roll. This is especially critical when close to the ground, or high power settings. Lower the nose, level the wings while applying rudder will let the plane climb. Use of the ailerons will most likely result in loss of control/spin. If you can't seem to get the plane climbing while close to the ground, slowly pull the power on the operative engine, and pick a spot to land, preferably straight ahead. Sim time, or recent engine out practice with an instructor is invaluable, and most likely will save your, and your passenger's lives. Training, training, training. That's the key to survival when things go bad.

IME it does require some aileron pressure (along with significant rudder pressure) to maintain coordinated flight at high power on one engine (even more with one windmilling).

Certainly one shouldn't attempt to counteract the asymmetrical thrust with aileron alone but neither rudder only nor wings level will produce maximum climb performance.

IMO the MOST important action if you run out of rudder or aileron is to reduce power on the good engine AND lower the nose.

_________________
-lance
Advice in this post may contain errors. Using said advice is totally at the risk of the user.


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2017, 09:34 
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Joined: 08/11/10
Posts: 62
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Location: Virgin Islands
Aircraft: C-55 Baron
From here in the Virgin Islands, I've been ordering parts from Rick Leatherwood at Arrell for more than 10 years ... for both my Travel Air and its successor, my C-55 Baron. RL is the greatest! ... efficient, fast, & friendly, with fair prices.


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2017, 10:42 
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Hi,

Recently the Baron that i flew has shown us some leak comming from the tip tank.

Coincidently we saw another Baron under maintenance, and i took some pictures (in attachment) of the intervention, with the same problem that ours.

Our Baron is the 58 2002, and the Baron of the photos is an G58 2010! They told me that the problem is the PRC seal around the vent tube. Is this happening with another aircrafts in US or its just a pontual issue with some aircrafts?

Ps: Currently flying in Brasil.

Regards,
Marcos.


Please login or Register for a free account via the link in the red bar above to download files.


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 Post subject: Re: Sticky - Baron Critical Items Relating To Safety of Flig
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2017, 12:09 
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Joined: 02/17/08
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Company: Orion Endeavors Inc.
Location: Gulf Shores, AL (KJKA)
Aircraft: 1982 Baron 58P
Good pictures of the area. Fortunately there are a couple of other ways with reasonable chances of success to cure this problem (leaking vent connection) without the disassembly shown.


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